The Consumer Matters is the blog of Leslie Grandy, aka Gearhead Gal.  My passion is creating and delivering compelling products that delight customers through simple and elegant user experience design.

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Wednesday
Jan022013

Will We Ever Really Get TV Anywhere?

I was raised on television and I consume a lot of it.  I am not a couch potato, but rather a road warrior, who likes to see favorite shows when and where it is convenient for me.  And, I subscribe to a lot of services that aspire to let me do that on my tablet, laptop or smartphone.

Admittedly, my family is not ready to cut the cord completely, but I have been evaluating several services that are meant to encourage just that.  Unlike Netflix, Hulu or Amazon, services like Aereo and NimbleTV (currently in beta) are pushing the envelope of broadcasting by enabling subscribers to watch live TV channels on a mobile device over the Internet, and providing cloud storage for recordings of the shows that I want to time-shift my viewing.

Where Aereo struggled to provide the breadth of programming I receive on a full cable package, Nimble TV has chosen to address this issue by subscribing users to a Dish Network account, which then streams most major basic cable channels in my area.  This opens up an array of programming that starts to make this solution truly viable as a cord cutting option.

Unfortunately, the quality of the stream has been sporadic, and this is particularly true of the recorded content.  Quality control tools appear in the UI (Low, High, and Auto) but, as of the beta, do not seem to allow toggling between SD or HD recordings.

Both Aereo and NimbleTV seem to struggle with executing robust DVR capabilities, one of the most essential experiences of my current home television provider. As an inaugural TiVo user, DVR features have become integral to my TV viewing.  On NimbleTV, programs appear to be available to be recorded in the guide even if they have already aired, but in fact can’t actually be recorded once they have aired.  Episodes appear in the “recorded” list, but actually won’t play back.  When I have been able to watch a recording, the image is pixilated, blurry and often unwatchable, even with full wifi connectivity. Riffing on what Seinfeld said about rental car reservations, scheduling a show to be recorded is only half the battle. Being able to actually view the recorded content really is the whole point.

 Which brings me back to my point about being a TV junkie and a road warrior. Streaming services are fine when coverage is strong, when there is wifi, and when data caps aren’t a limiter.  But as a traveler on trains, planes and subways, they fail to service my addiction.  Plane, rail and hotel wifi often provide me with inadequate bandwidth for uninterrupted streaming (and in some cases the airlines, Amtrak and wifi providers prevent streaming video services altogether.)  Many media players don’t effectively throttle to changing bandwidth, and my history with both Aereo and NimbleTV is that they have yet to perfect the user experience for variable bandwidth conditions.

 Without a complete solution for enabling quality television viewing when bandwidth is constrained, I find I still revert back to the dependability of purchased programming downloaded from iTunes paired with a streaming service from Hulu, Amazon, Netflix or a broadcaster’s own mobile app, like HBO GO.  Television substitute services may provide the convenience of aggregation and the benefit of smaller monthly bills, but if it is at the expense of quality and usability, they don’t feel like a better deal to me.

Editor's note: In fairness, I used both products in beta, and have assessed these experience based on my interest in switching from my existing services based on the interactions I had in beta.

Sunday
Dec302012

Three Great Quora Reads On Product Innovation

I have yet to integrate Quora in any regular or habitual way into my daily professional life. But from time to time, I dip back into the site and am delighted by the interesting insights I find buried among the snarky retorts and unanswered questions.

Here are three of my favorite recent reads on product innovation.

How does Apple keep secrets so well?

A former colleague from my time at the Apple Online store wrote, "In the end, it works because the employees want it to... They want to be part of the magic trick, and the most important part of magic is not revealing the secret."

Robert Scoble added these thoughts: "Because they are a hardware company they knew that letting details out about new products would kill sales of existing products, so they built that into their culture early on...Everything is on a need to know basis." In this world of agile software development, I would agree it is often hard for technologists to remember that hardware product lifecycles are not so short or very nimble. Manufacturing lines have to be set up, tooling has to be done and re-done, chipsets must be assembled, durability tested.

Scoble continued, "This [need to know]  extends even into meetings. If you are in a meeting and you aren't on the disclosure list for something you'll be asked to leave. Generally people don't bring up stuff in meetings they aren't allowed to discuss with the group." This, too was my own personal experience. If you don't believe security is a part of a company's culture, you haven't been asked to sign an NDA when you enter a meeting with your own colleagues in your own office building.

Why has Microsoft seemingly stopped innovating?

My former CEO at RealNetworks, (and once again Real's current CEO), Rob Glaser wrote in a "rather lengthy (War and Peace like) note" that "most of the action in technology innovation nowadays is taking place in areas where (i) PC software strength by itself is not sufficient, and (ii) the business models that lead to success are very different that the model that Microsoft was build on and is still at the core of Microsoft's DNA."

Glaser cites three value creating innovations in the past five years that Microsoft failed to nail: "(a) Search delivered to consumers/end users on the Web for free, supported by extremely valuable targeted ads (Google)  (b) Integrated Hardware/Software/Service device plays monetized both by selling the device and then selling services on top of the device (Apple, RIM) (c) Social Network Platforms that are free to consumers, based on user-generated information put into highly integrated and extensible structured frameworks, monetized a few different ways (Facebook)"

Scott Berkun, the author of the Myths of Innovation, pointed out, "The real tragedy is it takes  great products to be labeled an innovator by the mass media and consumer culture. Edison did not invent the lightbulb, but he made one that  worked well enough to be used by most people, that's why he gets all the  credit. Same for Ford. Microsoft has never been led as a products company - It's a  technology and platforms company. With that kind of strategy  middle-management and design-by-committee dominates, making the kind of  design vision and clarity of focus required to make a great product (or a  great user experience) very difficult culturally. The result is products that are often mediocre to experience, but have secondary value that enterprise and corporate customers respond to. This doesn't work as well for consumers, and consumer drive the perception of who is innovative and cool and who isn't."

What distinguishes the top 1% of product managers from the top 10%?

Former Yahoo exec, Henry Sohn, commented, "I would argue that the best product managers are the ones who can connect to the very best creators and help bring about the best products, and communicate that to the outside world.  

The most popular answer to this question, written by an Amazon senior manager, stresses the value of simplicity to the top echelon of product managers.  "A 1% PM knows how to get 80% of the value out of any feature or project with 20% of the effort. They do so repeatedly, launching more and achieving compounding effects for the product or business. "

Sunday
Dec162012

The Haggler Is My Hero

Every local news station in the country has a consumer advocate who rights the wrongs of their audience, from bad dry cleaners to absentee landlords. The stories they recount are also personal ones, painted with tears and broken hearts of consumers' dreams shattered.  Over time, these white knights have filled the air waves with maudlin, ratings enhancing tales.

And then there is The Haggler. The New York Times' answer to "7 On Your Side" or "Ask Jesse". And like the venerable Times, The Haggler takes a higher road in his literary explorations of consumers' woes.  Well written, insightful, and focused in his upbraiding of wireless carriers, cable companies, rental car agents and countless inhospitable customer service reps, The Haggler's columns are a Sunday must read for me.

This Sunday's column, readable here, epitomizes what I love about this righter of consumer wrongs.  It all boils down to "The Catch."

 

Tuesday
Nov132012

The Gadget Lovers' Answer to Burning Man - CES 2013 Preview

Your holiday gift list may be filled with gadgets, but right after you've opened all your presents the friendly people who made them will tell you that your newest tech toys are very shortly going to be too big, too slow or just too limited in their capabilities.

Each year in early January, consumer electronics manufacturers, automotive companies, and entertainment industry deal makers converge on Las Vegas by the hundreds of thousands for the annual gadget-lovers' answer to Burning Man, the Consumer Electronics Show. 

Click here to find out what the Consumer Electronics Association previewed to press and analysts before the next edition of this (in)famous industry trade show.

Wednesday
Oct032012

Are These The 475 Best Products Of The Year?

From drop testing to stain removal, the tests conducted by Consumer Reports for their annual buyer's guide have yielded an array of predictable brands and popular products. That shouldn't be a huge surprise in that quality and durability tend to drive consumer satisfaction, which is the bedrock of strong brands.

But before you start adding these items to your bridal registry or birthday wish list, keep in mind Consumer Reports notes,"The whopping bill [for these products] was $4.1 million: $1.6 million for products and $2.5 million for cars." 

So, do you agree with Consumer Reports these are the cream of the crop in electronics, applicances and automobiles? What don't you see on this list?

 

Monday
Sep172012

A Face Is Art That Deserves A Great Frame (And Other Design Truths)

Sunday
Sep162012

The Reality TV I'll Admit to Watching

I have to admit it...I'm a Shark Tank addict. Even though I wouldn't buy a lot of the products on the show, one of the things I love about it is how the program champions the value of the "speed pitch", a concept most entrepreneurs struggle with. Getting quickly to an easy-to-understand value proposition is the first place most pitch folks trip. I always know when the Sharks ask a presenter, "what are you actually selling?" that things will go south fast. 

Another common refrain that forebodes "no deal" from the Sharks is "what you are saying is that you want me to work for my money?" Sharks then go on to lament that the entrepreneur is merely a poseur, and not adequately driven to make their potential business successful. 

For more lessons to be learned from watching Shark Tank, click here to read the Fast Company rundown. 

Saturday
Sep152012

On a Mission to Disrupt the Apple Accessory Market

Two of my new favorite obsessions are Fab and Quirky, so I was delighted to learn about their new partnership. If you have an idea for an Apple accessory, then you can submit your idea and in lightening fast time, with the support of the online community, your idea can become a reality. And as if that wasn't enough, you might even earn a perpetual royalty for your genius. 

To kick off the company's new focus on Apple accessories, Ben Kaufman, Quirky's CEO, described the all night online design push that kicked off this partnership on his blog, "The launch of this project (and specifically the events that close out this week) is a bit of a throwback for me, having first run a live 24-hour product design sprint at mophie after a Steve Jobs keynote in September 2006, and another shortly after the launch of Quirky in September 2009 (see PowerCurl). These events produce great products, and are amazingly inspirational to watch."

Fab, a rising ecommerce star on a mission "to help people better their lives with design," will feature the results of the launch sprint in a sale on their site within a week from inception. On his blog, Betashop, Fab's CEO, Jason Goldberg writes, "Wednesday September 19, 3pm EST, just 7 days after the iPhone 5 was announced,  Fab launches a special sale featuring the newly design accessories. Smile, you’re designed to."

Wednesday
Jun062012

Passion, Presentation and Partnership - Tony Fadell on Building Great Products

Wednesday
May302012

Mary Meeker's All Things Digital Report - 2012 Internet Trends

Published May 2012 by Mary Meeker and Liang Wu

This report talks about today’s Internet growth and provides an in-depth look for the following new trends: 1) review of Internet stats and notes that Internet growth remains robust and rapid mobile adoption is still in early stages; 2) run through a number of examples of business models that are being re-imagined and re-invented thanks to mobile and social; 3) highlight mixed economic trends and 4) observe that while there’s a lot to be excited about in technology, there are things to be worried about regarding America’s financial situation.

KPCB Internet Trends 2012

Tuesday
May152012

Is There Value In A Brand Ideal?

Excerpted from Strategy & Business

"Any brand is simply the collective intent of the people behind it. To everyone your business touches, from employees to consumers, the brand defines who you are and what you stand for as a business. If you want great business results, you and your brand have to stand for something compelling. And that’s where brand ideals enter the equation.

A brand ideal is a shared intent by everyone in a business to improve people’s lives. The ability to leverage this ideal is what separates great business leaders from good, bad, or indifferent ones. A brand ideal is a business’s essential reason for being, the higher-order benefit it brings to the world."

If you asked each of your employees, would they communicate a singular shared intent? How about your customers? If there is confusion about what your brand's intention is amongst your staff, don't be surprised if your customers reflect that in how they value their relationship with you.

Tuesday
Apr242012

Are Silicon Valley Companies More Innovative?

According to a recent report from Booz & Co, there may be some truth to the theory that companies in the Bay Area have a distinct advantage in terms of cultivating innovation.  The research Booz's team conducted showed, "[These companies] are almost three times as likely to say their innovation strategies are tightly aligned with their overall corporate business strategies." More than double the number of Bay Area companies in the normal population indicated their corporate cultures supported their strategies.

On closer examination, the evidence does not suggest that the reason is really geographically based, however, there are regional trends that seem to support the trend.  As noted in the study, the Bay Area  is home to some of the nation’s greatest scientific research capacity. In addition, the Bay Area accounts for more than a third of the venture capital investment.

While investment and infrastructure certainly are foundational to ensure innovation has a chance, the report emphasizes that culture is really the deciding factor in perpetuating a company's bias towards innovation.  The Bay Area, it turns out, leads the nation in companies that follow the Need Seeker model of innovation, which Booz highlights as a significant differentiator.

You can read more about this study here.

 

 

 

Monday
Apr232012

An Interview with Bill Buxton on The State of Design

"What do you see being the biggest trends in technology over the next three to five years?


I see a shift to a place where we won't be dazzled just because a product is well designed and works well. Our collective customers should be able to take that for granted, and it is our job to make it so. But that is not enough. The problems of design and complexity do not go away, even if we all surpass that bar. Rather, they just move to a different place: the complexity that is emerging in terms of how all of these (individually) easy to use devices work together. We need a comprehensive ecosystem that combines elements of each to produce an integrated set of experiences for people, so they don't have to manage each of the underlying separate devices."

Full post on Engadget

 

Monday
Apr232012

Video Advertising: How New Consumer Habits Are Driving the Advertising Community to Innovate, and the Challenges with Scale

Traditional television is moving to the Internet. Though today's consumer can effectively avoid watching advertising on TV through new time- and place-shifting technologies, the “opt-out” function and other choices make it easier than ever for consumers to skip ads online too. Yet when asked, 75% of consumers prefer advertising over paid subscription models. To keep up with these new consumer video viewing habits and trends towards watching video content online, content owners, advertisers, and technologists must turn into entertainers, or lose precious eyeballs and dollars. To keep audiences captive, advertising must become the new form of entertainment. As content owners, advertisers and technologists begin to better understand video advertising opportunities, one important challenge has come to light: SCALE. On top of creating compelling advertising content, the problem for video advertising isn't targeting or ad formats. 

Join me and the fantastic line-up of panelists at Digital Hollywood 2012 in Marina Del Rey, CA.

Dmitri Lisitski, Commercial Director, 1+1 Group of companies (Ukraine)
Michael Knott, Vice President, Meredith Women's Network
James Citron, CEO, Mogreet
Michelle Cox, Vice President of Marketing, Metacafe® Entertainment Network (M.E.N)
Dean McCormick, Vice President, Advertising Solutions, BlackArrow

Monday
Apr162012

More On Creativity - John Cleese And The "Tortoise Mind"

It is easy for a professional comedy writer to advocate making definitive time and space boundaries in your day to enable creative thinking, but before you completely dismiss the possibility that John Cleese is actually a voice of corporate reason, take a listen to this video excerpt from a several years old lecture that he gave.  

 

In the full lecture, Cleese references a British psychologist's study of the "tortoise mind, [which is] a slower, less focused, less articulate, much more playful, almost dreamy" side of ourselves that must be allowed time to roam in order to be creative.  

And what does Cleese really think is the enemy of creativity?  "The widely held, but misguided, beliefs that being decisive means making decisions quickly, that fast is always better and that we should think of our minds as being like computers...The pressure on managers at all levels to act quickly is enormous." Cleese acknowledges that while we need to be able to multi-task, and let our "hare brain" dominate, we have to carve out time to balance our thinking with our tortoise mind. The book, and Cleese's application to business, are  detailed more in this New York Times article.

 

 

Sunday
Apr152012

Guest Post: How Luxury Brands Can Prepare for Affluent Millennials

This guest post is written by Lior Levin, a marketing consultant for a company that provides a to do list app for businesses and individuals, and who also consults for an inspection company that offers various Pre shipment inspections in China.


Millennials, meaning those between the ages of 18 and 29, are easily the fastest-growing market for luxury goods. Not only did they spend 31% more on such goods in 2011 than they did just one year prior, but due to their age, they have the potential to continue that growth for a lot longer than their older counterparts.

Clearly, Millennials are going to be a core target for luxury brands, however, they also pose an interesting set of challenges. Simply put, Millennials don’t buy luxury products in the same way as baby boomers or other generations nor do they value the same things in a luxury brand.

If luxury brands are going to appeal to Millennials, they need to start thinking about how to shift their marketing and their message to prepare for a very different type of consumer with very different wants and needs.

Luxury Alone is Not Enough

One of the biggest differences between Millennials and boomers is that, for Millennials, saying that a brand is a luxury and pricing it accordingly is not enough to convince them to buy.

Previously, buying a luxury good was as much about showcasing wealth as it was buying a superior product. Simply pricing something higher and marketing it as exclusive was enough to get most luxury buyers in the door. However, Millennials want to know what they are getting for the extra amount they are paying and how it will benefit them.

A recent study by Luxury Society found that shoppers favored quality, craftsmanship and design over brand name when promoting a luxury brand, making these elements key to showcase in any promotion.

If you can’t convey clearly why your brand is worth more than cheaper alternatives, Millennials will not be likely to spend their money with you. They simply feel no need to show off their wealth and will gladly buy a cheaper product if they feel it’s of the same quality and meets the same needs.

The Human Element

Luxury brands that do well with Millennials, such as Whole Foods, do so in large part because they focus on the human element of selling and marketing.

This includes both telling the story behind their brand and their products (including how and where it was made and who made it), but also treating the customer with respect and looking out for their best interests beyond merely trying to get the next sale.

Whole Foods stores tend to be warm and inviting places, Apple Stores tend to have legions of well-trained staff, and they do so not to ensure that they maximize sales, but to provide the best customer experience possible.

However, this appeal comes at price. Whole Foods doesn’t carry a lot of high-margin brands that don’t fit with their image and Apple Stores tend to have a lot of wasted floor space. But like all human connections, it’s a matter of give and take. The brands that give more to their customers will find them more willing to buy from them.

Brands that have thrived on being exclusive and unapproachable are going to have to change their customer-facing operations to better appeal to younger consumers that seek out a more human connection with what they buy.

The Use of Technology

Obviously, Millennials are much more comfortable with and eager to use technology than their older counterparts. Millennials grew up in a post-Internet age, and they expect the brands they buy, especially luxury ones, to be tech-savvy as well.

This use of technology isn’t just about how brands promote to customers, such as with online campaigns or high-tech in-store displays, but also about how they communicate and maintain contact with them. Email newsletters, text alerts, live chats and even video conferencing are just some of the ways brands can keep in touch with customers or have their customers contact them.

Luxury brands need to be where their customers are, and this means online, on social media and on mobile devices. This not only increases convenience for the customer, bringing the brand to them rather than the other way around, but it helps keep the name relevant and modern, two things Millennials value.

If a brand can’t stay current, it’s likely to be left behind and forgotten by younger customers.

All in all, Millennials are far more demanding of luxury brands, and they don’t necessarily reward the brands that they do purchase with an increased amount of brand loyalty. Millennials, as a group, tend to enjoy exploring and trying new things, even if it means leaving behind a brand that worked hard to get them as a customer.

Turning Millennials into customers isn’t going to be a matter of creating an exclusive group and daring them to join. Even the wealthiest Millennials don’t feel the need to flaunt their wealth or be a part of a “club”.

Millennials want facts to back up their purchases, a real human connection with the company they’re buying from and to have access to their brand wherever they are and whenever they want to.

Providing that is going to mean making a major shift for many luxury brands but those that can do that, such as Apple, will be able to ride the wave of the fastest-growing and, most likely, longest-lasting growth segment for luxury goods.

Those that don’t, such as Cadillac, will likely find themselves being viewed as antiquated and struggling to reach a younger audience as their current target market ages.

Thursday
Apr122012

A Big Payoff from Online Company Communities  

Membership engages customers, who spend more across the board.

Title: Social Dollars: The Economic Impact of Customer Participation in a Firm-Sponsored Online Community

Authors: Puneet Manchanda, Grant Packard, and Adithya Pattabhiramaiah (all University of Michigan)

Publisher: Ross School of Business Working Paper

Date Published: January 2012

Studies show that consumers are spending more of their leisure time online, and U.S. marketers are flocking to third-party social networks such as Facebook and Twitter to reach them. But companies as diverse as Amazon, Buy.com, Disney, IKEA, Kraft Foods, Lego, and Procter & Gamble are also making major investments to build their own consumer-centered online communities. According to a 2011 survey, nearly half of the top 100 global brands host some kind of network.  Read the full report.

Sunday
Apr012012

Humor: Has Google Gone Too Far? Wall Street Journal Op Ed

Excerpt Reprinted

Dear Google User: We're Sure You're Going to Love This

Dear Google User,

As you know, on March 1, we introduced a series of exciting changes to the privacy section of our terms of service agreement. Though we've done our best over the past month to systematically suppress search results and social-media commentary that have criticized these exciting changes, we have come to realize that this may not be the best way to deal with the massively negative feedback from those who use Google.

So we have decided to respond by doing what we do best: rolling out a new round of intrusive changes to the privacy section of our terms of service agreement.

But no need to worry. After using one of our patented algorithms to analyze a matrix of your Web-search behavior, online shopping habits, Google +1s, personal emails, confidential Gchat transcripts and cached browser data (including the stuff that you tried really hard to delete), we have determined, with statistical certainty, that you are really going to fall in love with our new privacy policy.

Read More...

Thursday
Mar222012

Is There a Role for Product?

Recently, I have found myself in several discussions about the value of product management.  On the west coast, specifically in Silicon Valley and the Pacific Northwest, there is a engineering-driven notion of product, borne from sort of a "maker" culture, which values the kind of invention that comes from tinkering in your garage. On the other hand, though my time here in New York City has been short, I have gotten an acute understanding of how differently product is defined to the businesses and industries that populate this centuries-old city.  Not surprisingly, media behemoths and financial services mega-corporations have for decades conceived of their products in board rooms and b-schools, not in garages (although DUMBO lofts seem desperately trying to become the east coast version of a mid-century tract house garage.)  I don't mean to disparage either as a source for great ideas. On the contrary, I simply suggest that both produce vastly different perspectives of the value, scope and purpose of a pure product management role. 

Steve Johnson, in his e-book, The Strategic Role of Product Management, writes, "Companies that do not see the value of product management go through a series of expansions and layoffs. They hire and fire and hire and fire the product management group. These same companies are the ones that seem to have a similar roller-coaster ride in revenue and profit." Service industries, especially the kind of which New York has no shortage - financial and professional services, are the ones that seem to struggle the most with defining a role for product managers. Why would that be the case? The answer lies in how the service is delivered, and who owns that workflow and the resulting customer experience it creates.  

Think about it...the organizational handoffs to deliver a service-only experience can produce a mosaic of interactions and customer touchpoints, based on each individual or system required to execute it.  In some companies, the only team that can wrangle the responsibility to oversee how these all knit together is a Chief Operating Officer, who might use a legion of business analysts to offer performance metrics which drive business and technical priorities, budget and resource allocation and decision-making.

This would also explain the challenge product teams can have finding a home in the reporting structure in these kinds of companies. If product is to be a front-line oriented job as part of the sales and marketing organization, then positioning, pricing, promotion and packaging become the lion's share of that PM's job. Ten years ago, I used to hear people call this an "Outbound" Product Manager job. (Johnson refers to this role as a Product Marketing Manager, but in today's economy, few companies can afford those to be two separate positions, and even if they do, they may call both functions Product Manager.) Alternatively, product may be absorbed by IT systems, taking requirements orders from internal stakeholders to evolve their executional platforms, like CRM and point of sale. 

For a great case study to review that highlights the impact of these different perspectives of service and technology companies on the role of product management, one need only look at Yahoo, and the inflection point it has revealed it is facing. After Terry Semel re-chartered Yahoo from being a search and communications platform company to a media company, one supportive employee posted this on his blog, "Cisco is a technology company, Yahoo! is a consumer services company — the fact that those services are delivered via IP is just a detail." But did that perspective provide the optimal vantage point for products to emerge that would allow Yahoo to compete successfully? For the first year or two, maybe, but with the downturn in the economy came a number of missed product opportunities for Yahoo, notably the failure to grow Delicious or make any deeper move into social networking after Messenger, and the stock has never recovered.

Kara Swisher writes on AllthingsD, "The way products are made got a long look-see this past week, in a day-long meeting that Thompson had with Yahoo’s top team execs. Thompson reportedly quizzed the group on its plans, and pressed it to look less at short-term features and maintenance than on finding the next great thing.

'I think it’s fair to say that Scott is wondering why Yahoo did not come up with innovations like Pinterest and Instagram,” said one person about hot new start-ups that are in the sweet spot of Yahoo’s business. “Or, at the very least, why it did not even try to buy them.'"

Steve Johnson points out that "8% of product managers report directly to the CEO, acting as his or her representative at the product level," because those leaders believe that markets, not marketing, should drive product strategy.

Just this week, Yahoo's Chief Product Officer announced via a memo revealed  “We have a bias toward action in Products and expected that our new org design would be in place well before any corporate changes took place. However, it is clear now that the two efforts are starting to run in parallel, and making Product org changes prior to corporate changes no longer makes sense.” 

But that does beg the question, when does it make sense to not consider those efforts in parallel?